Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cock or spout to let out water for extinguishing fire.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They are sometimes also placed at an equal distance from each of two separate fire-cocks; on the call being given to move forward, each party starts for the fire-cock to which it is ordered, and the first which gets into play is of course held to have beat the other.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • On arriving at the spot, he must take every means in his power to supply his engine with water, but especially by a service-pipe from a fire-cock, if that be found practicable.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • The fire-cock being opened by No. 5 (who remains by it as long as it is being used), the sergeant holds the end of the hose which supplies the engine, and at the same time superintends the men who work the levers.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • Double fire-cock used in the Government Dockyards 158

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • Double hollow key fire-cock used in the British Museum 159

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • Three or more policemen shall be in attendance upon the acting chief magistrate and fire-engine committee; two policemen shall constantly attend the master of the engines, to be at his disposal entirely; and one policeman shall attend with the water-officer at each fire-cock that may be opened.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • The proving of the hose is of very considerable importance, and the method of doing so which I have mentioned is greatly superior to the old plan of proving them on an engine or fire-cock.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • When the call to stop is given, with orders to attach one or more lengths of hose to the engine and fire-cock, it is done in the following manner: -- No. 1 takes out the branch pipe, and runs out as far as he thinks the hose ordered to be attached will reach, and there remains; No. 2 takes a length of hose out of the engine, and uncoils it towards No. 1; and No. 3 attaches the hose to the engine.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • In the first place it must depend on the relative height of the reservoir from whence the water is obtained and that of the fire-cock where the experiment is made; and as the supply of water drawn from the pipes by the inhabitants may be different on different days of the week and even in different hours of the day, it is quite evident that by this method no certain rule can be formed for the purpose required, the pressure being affected by the quantity of water drawn at the time.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • When the hose is to be taken up, it is uncoupled, and then wound up, beginning at the end farthest from the engine or from the fire-cock (as the case may be): by this method all the water is pressed out.] [Footnote I: In practising this exercise the men are in the habit of descending by the chains from the parapet of the North Bridge,

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

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