Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past of forlese.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • imp. pl. & p. p. of forlese.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • An erroneous form for *forlose, forlese, after forlorn.
  • See forlorn.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • '"I'm old an' forlore, "she sez, thremblin 'an' cryin '," and 'tis like I say a dale more than I mane. "

    Life's Handicap

  • Yea, I farewelled my heart on parting day * And heartless, hopeless, now I bide forlore:

    Arabian nights. English

  • And he fared on escorted by one of his pages; but when he came to the new palace, he found the Wazir prostrate on the carpet, knowing not his head from his heels; so he searched the place right and left for his daughter, but found her not; whereat he was troubled sore with concern galore and his wits forlore.

    Arabian nights. English

  • Therewith up sprang the gardener lad and mounting one of the young men's mules, was absent awhile, after which he returned with a Cairene girl, as she were a sheep's tail, fat and delicate, or an ingot of pure silvern ore or a dinar on a porcelain plate or a gazelle in the wold forlore.

    Arabian nights. English

  • What ails them to torture this heart forlore * And deem right for loving my blood t 'outpour:

    Arabian nights. English

  • -- "Unfit for the world and for the faith forlore."

    Arabian nights. English

  • The beasts, their caves, the birds, their nests forlore.

    Jerusalem Delivered

  • Therewith up sprang the gardener lad and mounting one of the young men’s mules, was absent awhile, after which he returned with a Cairene girl, as she were a sheep’s tail, fat and delicate, or an ingot of pure silvern ore or a dinar on a porcelain plate or a gazelle in the wold forlore.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • But as she was hearty of heart she advanced till the two met and fell to fight and struck each at other, but the lion waxed furious and gnashed his tusks, now retreating and now circuiting around her and then returning to front his foe purposing to claw her, when she heartened her heart and without giving ground she swayed her sabre with all the force of her forearm and struck the beast between the eyes and the blade came out gleaming between his thighs and he sank on earth life-forlore and weltering in his gore.

    Arabian nights. English

  • 5.3.20: Thou hadst not spent thy trauail thus nor al thy paine forlore.

    "Songes and Sonettes written by the ryght honorable Lorde Henry Haward late Earle of Surrey, and other"

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