Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A coach, superior to a hackney-coach, hired for the day or any short period as a private carriage: so called because originally only private carriages had glass windows.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I had a perfect recollection of the glass-coach, and the sheriffs, and the men in armour, and the band playing "Jim along Josey," as we passed the

    Punch, or the London Charivari. Volume 1, July 31, 1841

  • On Monday night, the Twentieth of June 1791, about eleven o'clock, there is many a hackney-coach and {125} glass-coach still rumbling or at rest on the streets of Paris.

    A Book of English Prose Part II, Arranged for Secondary and High Schools

  • Lionel's desire, the young pair drove in a glass-coach, drawn by eight swift chargers, through the forest, Lilias bearing in her hands a large posy of water-lilies -- away, past the cascade, and on, to the opening of the gold-mine, at the back of the mountain.

    Fifty-Two Stories For Girls

  • Yes, after mature reflection, and considerable experience, we are decidedly of opinion, that of all known vehicles, from the glass-coach in which we were taken to be christened, to that sombre caravan in which we must one day make our last earthly journey, there is nothing like an omnibus.

    Sketches by Boz, illustrative of everyday life and every-day people

  • But who shall portray the astonishment of Gordon - place, when Mr. Robinson handed in ALL the Miss Willises, one after the other, and then squeezed himself into an acute angle of the glass-coach, which forthwith proceeded at a brisk pace, after the other glass-coach, which other glass-coach had itself proceeded, at

    Sketches by Boz, illustrative of everyday life and every-day people

  • At last the Miss Willises 'door opened; the door of the first glass-coach did the same.

    Sketches by Boz, illustrative of everyday life and every-day people

  • A glass-coach was stationed before the door of Ronsin, the saddler, as if waiting for some visitors of Ronsin's.

    The Peasant and the Prince

  • On Monday night, the Twentieth of June 1791, about eleven o'clock, there is many a hackney-coach, and glass-coach (carrosse de remise), still rumbling, or at rest, on the streets of Paris.

    The French Revolution

  • There is, almost nex door to the ambasdor's hotel, another hotel, of that lo kind which the French call cabbyrays, or wine-houses; and jest as master's green glass-coach pulled up, another coach drove off, out of which came two ladies, whom I knew pretty well, -- suffiz, that one had

    The Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush

  • Well, master's glass-coach droav up, jest as I got within a few yards of the door; our carridge, I say, droav up, and stopt.

    The Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush

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