Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The lignum-vitæ, Guaiacum officinale and G. sanctum.
  • n. In the southwestern United States and Mexico, a shrub or small tree, Porlieria angustifolia, closely related to the lignumvitæ.
  • n. In Argentina, a large leguminous tree, Cæsalpinia melanocarpa, yielding a very hard, heavy wood which resembles lignumvitæ except that it is of a reddish-black color. Its fruits are used for tanning and dyeing in the same manner as divi-divi.
  • n. In Panama, a bignoniaceous tree, Tecoma Guayacan.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Here we are referring to "guayacan" or "palo santo" (Guyacum officinialis) and

    Chapter 12

  • Valuable timber species such as mahogany, cedar, 'siricote' and 'guayacan' are being exhausted through over-exploitation.

    Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, Mexico

  • Shooting down the cañon came a giant guayacan (a near relation of the true hard-wood trees which will not float); it must have stood a hundred and fifty feet before the water had eaten away the bank wherein it was rooted, and it had toppled over like a ninepin, to be swept, perhaps, hundreds of miles, and finally to be caught in the boulders and form yet another "snag."

    Head Hunters of the Amazon: Seven Years of Exploration and Adventure

  • Here the guayacan, or guayacum of the arts, is found in great abundance.

    The Western World Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural History in North and South America

  • The principal woods exported are mahogany, guayacan, known to commerce as lignum vitae (one of the hardest woods and so heavy that when in loading the steamer a log drops into the sea it sinks to the bottom like iron), bera or bastard lignum vitae, espinillo or yellowwood, campeche or logwood (a famous dyeing material), sparwood and cedar.

    Santo Domingo A Country with a Future

  • (Dioscorea alata), copei (Clusia alba), guayacan (Guaiacum officinale), guajaba (Psidium pyriferum), guanavano (Anona muricata), mani (Arachis hypogaea), guama (Inga), henequen (was supposed from the erroneous accounts of the first travellers to be an herb with which the Haitians used to cut metals; it means now every kind of strong thread), hicaco

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • (Dioscorea alata), copei (Clusia alba), guayacan (Guaiacum officinale), guajaba (Psidium pyriferum), guanavano (Anona muricata), mani (Arachis hypogaea), guama (Inga), henequen (was supposed from the erroneous accounts of the first travellers to be an herb with which the Haitians used to cut metals; it means now every kind of strong thread), hicaco (Chrysobalanus icaco), maghei

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 1

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