Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A shrub (Parthenium argentatum) of the southwest United States and Mexico whose sap was considered a potential source of natural rubber during World War II.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. much-branched subshrub with silvery leaves and small white flowers of Texas and northern Mexico; cultivated as a source of rubber

Etymologies

American Spanish, from Nahuatl cuauhuli : cuahuitl, tree + uli, latex gum.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Superb natural latex from a desert shrub called guayule (why-YOU-lee) makes high-quality gloves, medical devices, and other in-demand natural rubber products.

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  • (February 20, 2009) - Superb natural latex from a desert shrub called guayule (why-YOU-lee) makes high-quality gloves, medical devices, and other in-demand natural rubber products.

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  • Scientists say a desert plant called guayule offers a new, natural rubber alternative without the proteins that trigger allergic reactions.

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  • (March 7, 2009) - Superb natural latex from a desert shrub called guayule (why-YOU-lee) makes high-quality gloves, medical devices, and other in-demand natural rubber products.

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  • All Yulex products are derived from a desert plant called guayule (why-you-lee) which is grown in commercial farms throughout southern Arizona.

    The Earth Times Online Newspaper

  • The new latex is derived from the guayule bush, native to the Southwestern U.S.

    New Latex Glove

  • Department of Agriculture to make a latex substitute from guayule, a desert plant in the Southwest that doesn't contain the allergy-triggering protein.

    Hidden Hazard:

  • In the Southwest, the Intercontinental Rubber Company had 32,000 acres planted in guayule, Parthenium argentatum, a plant that yields 20 percent of its gross weight as pure white latex.

    One River

  • Among other things, it has introduced to the world grossly neglected plant species such as jojoba, guayule, leucaena, mangium, amaranth, and the winged bean.

    Chapter 32

  • Water quantity and quality requirements of guayule: current assessment.

    Chapter 10

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