Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • “Schultes looked for guayusa when he came here in the forties, but he never found it,” Tim said.

    One River

  • In the lowlands of Ecuador, Jivaro warriors traditionally used infusions of guayusa to purify themselves and their families before shrinking the heads of their slain enemies.

    One River

  • J., “The Flowers of Ilex guayusa,” Botanical Museum Leaflets 275: 155-60, 1990.

    One River

  • To this day they employ guayusa as a ritual mouthwash before making curare or taking yagé.

    One River

  • The third and by far the most mysterious is Ilex guayusa.

    One River

  • For Schultes on guayusa, see “Ilex guayusa from 500 A.D. to the Present,” Etnologiska Studier 32: 115-38, Gothenburg, Sweden, 1972; “Discovery of an Ancient Guayusa Plantation in Colombia,” Botanical Museum Leaflets 275-6: 143-60, 1979.

    One River

  • When the Jesuits first contacted the tribe, they declared guayusa the “quintessence of evil.”

    One River

  • Breakfasting on fried yucas, roasted plantains, fish, and guayusa, we set sail, arriving at Coca at 2 P.M. This little village, the last we shall see till we come within sight of the Amazon, is beautifully located on the right bank, twenty-five feet above the river, and opposite the confluence of the Rio Coca.

    The Andes and the Amazon Across the Continent of South America

  • It is a singular fact, observes Dr. Jameson, that tea, coffee, cacao, maté, and guayusa contain the same alkaloid caffeine.

    The Andes and the Amazon Across the Continent of South America

  • Their only stimulants are chicha, guayusa, and tobacco.

    The Andes and the Amazon Across the Continent of South America

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