Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of habergeon.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Quoth Shawahi, “Thy sister, Queen Nur al-Huda, biddeth thee clothe thy sons in the two habergeons which she fashioned for them and send them to her by me, and I will take them and forego thee with them and be the harbinger of glad tidings and the announcer of thy coming to her.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And Uzziah prepared for them throughout all the host shields, and spears, and helmets, and habergeons, and bows, and slings to cast stones.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • And it came to pass from that time forth, that the half of my servants wrought in the work, and the other half of them held both the spears, the shields, and the bows, and the habergeons; and the rulers were behind all the house of Judah.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • And Uzzi'ah prepared for them throughout all the host shields, and spears, and helmets, and habergeons, and bows, and slings to cast stones.

    2 Chronicles 26.

  • A thousand of the Nibelung knights in habergeons went with them, that had left fair women at home, the which they never saw more.

    The Fall of the Niebelungs

  • They hurtle together either against other at the passing so mightily, that the flinders of iron from the mail of their habergeons stick into their foreheads and faces, and the blood leapeth forth by mouth and nose so that their habergeons were all bloody.

    The High History of the Holy Graal

  • And their feet and arms had been stricken off, but their bodies were still all armed, and the habergeons thereon were all black as though they had been blasted of lightning.

    The High History of the Holy Graal

  • The knights draw asunder to take their career, for their spears were broken short, and they come back the one toward the other with a great rush, and smite each other on the breast with their spears so stiffly that there is none but should have been pierced within the flesh, for the habergeons might protect them not.

    The High History of the Holy Graal

  • Meliot moveth toward Clamados right swiftly and Clamados toward him, and they melled together on their shields in such sort that they pierced them and cleft the mail of their habergeons asunder with the points of their spears, and the twain are both wounded so that the blood rayeth forth of their bodies.

    The High History of the Holy Graal

  • Briant of the Isles and Lancelot come against each other so stoutly that they pierce their shields and cleave their habergeons, and they thrust with their spears so that the flesh is broken under the ribs and the shafts are all-to-splintered.

    The High History of the Holy Graal

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