half-barbarous love

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Examples

  • Halbert Glendinning, for he now bore the rank of knighthood, was perpetually summoned to attend his patron on distant expeditions, or on perilous enterprises, or to assist him with his counsel in the doubtful intrigues of a half-barbarous court.

    The Abbot

  • A wicked, half-barbarous, idle-people may be controlled — but not a people thoughtful, educated, and industrious.

    Phineas Finn

  • And then they declare to themselves that this wicked, half-barbarous, idle people should be controlled and not represented.

    Phineas Finn

  • But what was she that a man should give up everything and go away and spend his days in some half-barbarous country for her alone?

    The Way We Live Now

  • Negro there was a constant coming and going of the natives, evidently excited by the arrest of Joam Dacosta, and who could say to what excesses these half-barbarous men might be led?

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • While passing through this curious crowd, the eye could not but find pleasure in the novel scene, the more especially as the delight of these half-barbarous people was excited to the highest pitch by the strange being who had come among them.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 117, July, 1867.

  • The Hanseatic merchants were also pioneers in the half-barbarous lands of northern and eastern Europe, where they founded towns, fostered industry, and introduced comforts and luxuries previously unknown.

    Early European History

  • The rate of mortality in 1690 was one in thirty-three; in 1780 it was one in forty; and it stands now at one in sixty, -- the healthiest condition in Europe, -- while in half-barbarous

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 39, January, 1861

  • This now silent and empty house was once enlivened and brightened by the fair Letitia and her large family of children, just like other men's children; schoolboys toiling at their Plutarch or Cæsar, and their three young sisters growing up careless and rather wild, like their neighbours 'daughters, in the half-barbarous island town.

    Itinerary through Corsica by its Rail, Carriage & Forest Roads

  • These treaties are given by De Clercq, "Recueil de Traités," vol.iv. pp. 594, 597; but whether these half-barbarous Sàkalàva, ignorant of reading and writing, knew what they were doing, is very doubtful.

    The Contemporary Review, January 1883 Vol 43, No. 1

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