half-suppressed love

half-suppressed

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • She embraced Elizabeth, and said, in a voice of half-suppressed emotion, Farewell, sweet lady, dearest Elizabeth, my beloved and only friend; may heaven in its bounty bless and preserve you; may this be the last misfortune that you will ever suffer.

    Chapter 7

  • She embraced Elizabeth, and said, in a voice of half-suppressed emotion, Farewell, sweet lady, dearest Elizabeth, my beloved and only friend; may heaven, in its bounty, bless and preserve you; may this be the last misfortune that you will ever suffer.

    Chapter 8

  • Again the flashing glance, the half-suppressed smirk.

    The Priest

  • Patch Darragh, who plays Tom, all but quivers with half-suppressed rage.

    A Masterpiece Made Manifest

  • Zeus began to dog-dream growl, accompanied by a half-suppressed dog-dream bark, a funny little wuf that made his lips flubber.

    The Six Rules of Maybe

  • Just a week ago, Waltz with Bashir, the animated documentary film Folman directed in which he explores his own nightmarish, half-suppressed memories of that period, was given its first underground screening in Lebanon -- not far, in fact, from Hezbollah headquarters in southern Beirut -- though the film is officially banned in that country.

    Tom Engelhardt: Waltz with Bashir: The Graphic Novel

  • “That of rendering yourself acceptable to a girl you have known for so many years?” said Middlemas with a half-suppressed sneer.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • In a labial dawn I savoured salty draughts of liquor springing from your tumid lips, luxuriated in a magnanimity your primal crouch expressed, heard half-suppressed love-cries tell the tumult in your loins.

    When I Close My Eyes (rev)

  • Such licence was as natural in a country that had within ninety years gone through a violent civil war, a revolutionary change of government and line, and a half-suppressed dispute of succession, as it would have been astonishing in France, where the continuity of outward order had never been more than superficially ruffled, even in the most turbulent times of the factious wars of the League and the

    Voltaire

  • Returning to Paris in November, 1837, the countess entered society for the first time as a married woman during the winter which had just ended, and she then became aware of the existence, half-suppressed and wholly dumb but very useful, of a species of factotum who was personally invisible, named Paz, — spelt thus, but pronounced “Patz.”

    The Imaginary Mistress

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