Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One of the two curved wooden or metal pieces of a harness that fits around the neck of a draft animal and to which the traces are attached.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A covering, skin, membrane.
  • n. Part of the harness that fits round the neck of a draught horse that the reins pass through.
  • n. Scottish form of home
  • n. Alternative form of halm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Home.
  • n. One of the two curved pieces of wood or metal, in the harness of a draught horse, to which the traces are fastened. They are fitted upon the collar, or have pads fitting the horse's neck attached to them.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A covering; a skin; a membrane.
  • n. One of two curved pieces of wood or metal in the harness of a draft-horse, to which the traces are fastened, and which lie upon the collar or have pads attached to them fitting the horse's neck. See cut under harness.
  • n. An obsolete or dialectal form of halm.
  • n. A Scotch form of home.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. stable gear consisting of either of two curved supports that are attached to the collar of a draft horse and that hold the traces

Etymologies

Middle English, from Middle Dutch; see tkei- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English hame, home, from Old English hama, homa ("a cover, skin"), from Proto-Germanic *hamô (“clothes, skirt”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱam- (“cover, clothes”). Cognate with Danish ham ("skin, bladder, figure"), Danish hams ("shell, sleeve"). More at heaven. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English, from Middle Dutch hame ("horse collar, harness, fishnet"), from Old Dutch *hamo, from Proto-Germanic *hamô (“fishnet, collar for a horse”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱam- (“part of a harness”). Cognate with Middle Low German ham, hame ("collar, fishnet"), Old High German hamo ("sack-like fishnet") (Modern German dialectal Hame, Hamen ("hand fishnet"), Ham ("horse collar")). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English ham, from Old English hām ("home"). More at home. (Wiktionary)
From earlier haum, haume. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • 'Come hame, come hame!' answered the _colonel_, with both accent and quantity heaped on the word _hame_.

    Adela Cathcart, Volume 1

  • Indeed it was his custom, though Elsie had not known it, to follow every funeral going to this, his favourite churchyard of Ruthven; and, possibly in imitation of its booming, for it was still tolled at the funerals, he had given the old bell the name of _the wow_, and had translated its monotonous clangour into the articulate sounds -- _come hame, come hame_.

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • Amidst the sounds of derision that followed him, might be heard the words frequently repeated -- "_Come hame, come hame_."

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • She sat in the churchyard of the ancient parish church of Ruthven; and when she lifted up her eyes, there she saw, in the half-ruined belfry, the old bell, all but hidden with ivy, which the passing wind had roused to utter one sleepy tone; and there beside her, stood the fool with the bell on his arm; and to him and to her the _wow o 'Rivven_ said, "_Come hame, come hame_!"

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • "One still night of summer, the nurse who watched by her bedside heard her murmur through her sleep, 'I hear it: _come hame -- come hame_.

    Adela Cathcart, Volume 1

  • One still night of summer, the nurse who watched by her bedside heard her murmur through her sleep, "I hear it: _come hame -- come hame_.

    The Portent & Other Stories

  • I am a quiet settler, whose business only is to mak a hame for my wife and bairn; but, if you ask me to drink success to the Congress and confusion to the king's troops, I tell you I willna do it; not even if you are brutal enough, but this I canna believe possible, to carry your threats into execution.

    True to the Old Flag A Tale of the American War of Independence

  • Prince Charlie cam 'hame' to Rome; and the refusal there of even a titular kingship.

    Pickle the Spy; Or, the Incognito of Prince Charles

  • "The evening brings a 'hame';" so should it be here -- should it especially be in a dramatic work.

    Robert Louis Stevenson: a record, an estimate, and a memorial

  • "The evening brings a '' hame '" and the end ought to show something to satisfy the innate craving (for it is innate, thank

    Robert Louis Stevenson: a record, an estimate, and a memorial

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