Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. timorous; timid; easily frightened.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Timorous; timid; easily frightened.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Timorous, like a hare; easily frightened.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mr. Fearing, for that hare-hearted pilgrim would be doing things in the house that he himself would scarcely do who had been in the house a thousand times.

    Bunyan Characters (2nd Series)

  • Turn from this hare-hearted citizen, and think of our hero, the pride of England, the flower of the human race -- Charles Gordon.

    Side Lights

  • Stranded Whigs, crotchetty manufacturers; dissentient religionists; the half-minded, the hare-hearted; the I would and I would-not -- shifty creatures, with youth's enthusiasm decaying in them, and a purse beginning to jingle; fearing lest we do too much for safety, our enemy not enough for safety.

    Beauchamp's Career — Complete

  • Light Louvet glances hare-eyed, not hare-hearted: only virtuous

    The French Revolution

  • From a certain directness of construction, from the simple means by which Oak's ruin is accomplished in the opening chapters, I did not expect that the story would run hare-hearted in its close, but the moment Troy told his wife that he never cared for her, I suspected something was wrong; when he went down to bathe and was carried out by the current I knew the game was up, and was prepared for anything, even for the final shooting by the rich farmer, and the marriage with Oak, a conclusion which of course does not come within the range of literary criticism.

    Confessions of a Young Man

  • George Sand must fain suppress all mention of her Italian journey with Musset, a true account of which would have been an immortal story; but of hypocritical hare-hearted allusions Rousseau and Casanova were not made; in their memoirs women never get further than some slight fingering of laces; and in their novels they are too subject to their own natures to attain the perfect and complete realisation of self, which the so-called impersonal method alone affords.

    Modern Painting

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