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Examples

  • At a time in the late 19th century when no viable roads, save for a dusty serpentine track, led to Puerto Angel, hill-dwelling peons would descend to the sea leading their heavily-laden burros to the ships.

    Mexico's endless Pacific beach: sun, surf, sand, seafood and solitude

  • I frequently use the combi instead of driving if my day's outing is casual, and return by taxi if I become heavily-laden with some extra-curricular shopping.

    Charging for parking

  • The food supply (plus personal health care and cleaning products as well) in the U.S. in particular is so heavily-laden with preservatives and chemical agents that one almost has to be a trained scientist to deconstruct labels these days.

    Randall Amster: The Most Common Disease You've Never Heard Of

  • The food supply plus personal health care and cleaning products as well in the U.S. in particular is so heavily-laden with preservatives and chemical agents that one almost has to be a trained scientist to deconstruct labels these days.

    Randall Amster: The Most Common Disease You've Never Heard Of

  • It is no child's play to set a heavily-laden sledge in motion time after time.

    The South Pole~ Through the Mountains

  • It was no great pleasure to cross over here on ski, but with heavily-laden sledges the enjoyment would be still less.

    The South Pole~ Through the Mountains

  • This was our best day's work of the whole voyage, and it is no bad performance for a vessel like the Fram, with her limited sail area and her heavily-laden hull.

    The South Pole~ From Madeira to the Barrier

  • In a case of irony so heavily-laden as to set off every metal detector on the DC Mall, Senator Diane Feinstein D has proposed, after considerable wailing and gnashing of teeth, that the various eateries be privatized.

    When Only the Best Will Do.

  • The concepts of "merit" and "qualifications" can prove to be heavily-laden value-judgements, not merely tools to assess measurable skills.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • Boston is built on a collection of peninsulas; and as certain shipowners possess wharfs far up in the town, to which their ships must find their way, the virtue of patience is frequently inculcated by a long detention at drawbridges, while heavily-laden vessels are slowly warped through the openings.

    The Englishwoman in America

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