Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of hell-hound.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wiltshire is one of the most popular areas for sightings of phantom dogs, shucks or hell-hounds.

    the black dog and the scottish play, indeed

  • The study found that despite being in time of accelerating technology, 21st century Britons have not turned their back on ghouls, boggarts, hell-hounds, witches, wizards, banshees and black magic curses, with a whopping 968 reports of demonic activity in the past 25 years.

    the black dog and the scottish play, indeed

  • He hid in a hollow tree until after dark, watching “these ravenous hell-hounds” who were “yelping and screaming like so many devils.”

    George Washington’s First War

  • One of the hunters, a little dark-eyed man whom his mates called “Smoke,” was telling stories, liberally intersprinkled with oaths and obscenities; and every minute or so the group of hunters gave mouth to a laughter that sounded to me like a wolf-chorus or the barking of hell-hounds.

    Chapter 3

  • Newspaper editorials regularly denounced the “Southern hell-hounds” back east.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • The secessionists, known collectively as “Southern hell-hounds” or “Copperhead Sneaks,” did not respond.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • Colonel Baum, who was mortally wounded, said of the militiamen: "They fought more like hell-hounds than soldiers."

    History of American Women

  • Ah, woe is me! whither am I rushing, leaving my babes unguarded for hell-hounds to mangle, to be murdered and ruthlessly cast forth upon the hills, a feast of blood for dogs?

    Hecuba

  • Del Toro constructs his fantasy with bold colors that emphasize character natures and relationships while also making for visually sumptuous setpieces between our Devil-spawned badass and a number of monstrous hell-hounds among other encroaching forces of evil.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • In her narrative of captivity among the Indians during King Philip's War, Mary Rowlandson frequently employs Puritan demonizing rhetoric, calling her captors infidels, hell-hounds, and savages.

    History of American Women

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