hendecasyllable love

hendecasyllable

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A line, verse, or word that comprises eleven syllables.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A metrical line of eleven syllables.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A metrical line of eleven syllables.

Etymologies

From the Latin hendecasyllabi, from the Ancient Greek ἑνδεκασύλλαβοι (hendekasullaboi); equivalent to hendeca- +‎ syllable. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Philip Sidney written every asclepiad on the model of Where man's mind hath a freed consideration, every hendecasyllable like Where sweet graces erect the stately banner, the adjustment of accent and quantity thus attained might, I think, have induced greater poets than he to make the experiment on a larger scale.

    Poems and Fragments

  • The alternation of this decasyllabic rhythm with the ordinary hendecasyllable is studiously artistic; I have retained it throughout.

    Poems and Fragments

  • Had Sir Philip Sidney written every asclepiad on the model of _Where man's mind hath a freed consideration_, every hendecasyllable like _Where sweet graces erect the stately banner_, the adjustment of accent and quantity thus attained might, I think, have induced greater poets than he to make the experiment on a larger scale.

    The Poems and Fragments of Catullus

  • 'There's an unpremeditated hendecasyllable for you.

    Meditations

  • With Statius, as with Martial, the hendecasyllable always begins with a spondee.

    Post-Augustan Poetry From Seneca to Juvenal

  • His miniature painting was in place, his sprightly and dexterous handling of the hexameter and the hendecasyllable could be more profitably employed.

    Post-Augustan Poetry From Seneca to Juvenal

  • He manifested a decided interest in the Italian lyric measures, already given some elaboration by Sâ de Miranda, and displayed some skill in the use of the hendecasyllable.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • To him is due no little credit for the skill with which he transplanted, even excelling his older comrade Boscan, the Italian sonnet with its hendecasyllable, the canzone, the terza rima, and other forms.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Italian verse-forms (the hendecasyllable, the octave, the sonnet, the canzone, etc.) are naturalized definitively by Juan Boscan (about 1490-1542) and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • The man who first achieved real success in the hendecasyllable, combined in sonnets, octaves, _terza rima_ and blank verse, was Juan

    Modern Spanish Lyrics

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