Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having the same essence or substance, especially with reference to the first and second persons of the Trinity

Etymologies

From Ecclesiastical Latin homousianus, from Greek ὁμοούσιος, from ὁμο ‘same’ + ουσία ‘essence’. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Accordingly, he had recourse to the following measures: he knew that Constantius was hated by all the people who held the homoousian faith and had driven them from the churches and had proscribed and exiled their bishops.

    A Source Book for Ancient Church History

  • For so the holy and homoousian Trinity, the Creator and

    A Source Book for Ancient Church History

  • He does not flippantly ridicule the homoousian and the homoiousian as mere words, but the expression and exponent of profound theological distinctions, as every theologian knows them to be.

    Beacon Lights of History

  • One of the chants of the production's liturgy is that two things are certain: that we will die; and that we must transgress the limits of our existence, break and smash taboos, in the urge to transform suffering into pleasure; body and soul, pain and pleasure homoousian.

    Superfluities Redux

  • Thus, the Son is essentially different from the Father, which entails a denial of homoousian.

    PhilGons.com

  • Must you not deny homoousian on the basis of your own premises?

    PhilGons.com

  • Neither he nor Tom shows how their position-on their own premises-can account for any necessary differences without denying homoousian, because, they argue, all necessary differences are essential differences.

    PhilGons.com

  • Athanasius, the learned Gregory Nazianzen, and the other pillars of the church, who supported with ability and success the Nicene doctrine, appeared to consider the expression of substance as if it had been synonymous with that of nature; and they ventured to illustrate their meaning, by affirming that three men, as they belong to the same common species, are consubstantial, or homoousian to each other.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • But the more fashionable saints of the Arian times, the intrepid Athanasius, the learned Gregory Nazianzen, and the other pillars of the church, who supported with ability and success the Nicene doctrine, appeared to consider the expression of substance as if it had been synonymous with that of nature; and they ventured to illustrate their meaning, by affirming that three men, as they belong to the same common species, are consubstantial, or homoousian to each other.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 2

  • He thinks it his duty to reconcile two orthodox synods.] [Footnote 58: According to Aristotle, the stars were homoousian to each other.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 2

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