Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One of an imaginary corps of mounted marine soldiers; hence, a person out of his element and unfit for his place, as such a soldier would be on board ship: also humorously employed in a literal sense.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Navy of the United States are conjointly typified in a horse-marine who flies headlong with his hands pressed convulsively over his ears.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 38, December, 1860

  • She was frequently a sort of magnificent horse-marine who bounced herself into the presence of prominent individuals, thrusting her venomed points on those who had been flattered into listening; at other times she was feline in her methods.

    The Tragedy of St. Helena

  • This horse-doctor, as he termed him, he looked upon as being as well fitted to describe a naval engagement as the proverbial horse-marine would be to take part in one.

    James Fenimore Cooper American Men of Letters

  • "What, do you mean to say that lankey, horse-marine looking fellow is as bad as that?" said the admiral.

    Varney the vampire; or, The feast of blood. Volume 1

  • "Me a horse-marine! didn't you ask a plain question of a fellow, and get a plain answer?"

    Varney the vampire; or, The feast of blood. Volume 1

  • Just then a man, who, from his nautical appearance, might have been called a "horse-marine," rode up on

    The Young Rajah

  • There was one huge lanky fellow, that looked like a soldier, and had a halberd; another was habited in a sailor's costume, with a fascinating patch over one eye; and a third, who seemed the leader of the gang, was a stout man in a sailor's frock and a horseman's jack-boots, whom one might fancy, if he were anything, to be a horse-marine.

    Catherine: a Story

  • "No, no, Tom Sawyer," I remember hearing one of the latter observe, "you shall not have little Ben to turn into a horse-marine on no account.

    Ben Burton Born and Bred at Sea

  • There was one huge lanky fellow, that looked like a soldier, and had a halberd; another was habited in a sailor’s costume, with a fascinating patch over one eye; and a third, who seemed the leader of the gang, was a stout man in a sailor’s frock and a horseman’s jack-boots, whom one might fancy, if he were anything, to be a horse-marine.

    Catherine: a story

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