Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The clear fluid portion of cytoplasm as distinguished from the granular and netlike components. Also called ground substance.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A structureless fluid in cells; cytosol

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A clear, homogeneous protoplasm; hyaline.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the clear nongranular portion of the cytoplasm of a cell

Etymologies

Greek hualos, glass + -plasm.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Under stimulation the hyaloplasm passes into the pores of the spongioplasm; without stimulation it tends to pass out as in the formation of pseudopodia.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • In muscle there is the same thing, viz., a framework of spongioplasm staining with hematoxylin—the substance of the sarcous element—and this encloses a clear hyaloplasm, the clear substance of the sarcomere, which resists staining with this reagent.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • In an ameboid cell, there is a framework of spongioplasm, which stains with hematoxylin and similar reagents, enclosing in its meshes a clear substance, hyaloplasm, which will not stain with these reagents.

    IV. Myology. 2. Development of the Muscles

  • —The yolk comprises (1) the cytoplasm of the ordinary animal cell with its spongioplasm and hyaloplasm; this is frequently termed the formative yolk; (2) the nutritive yolk or deutoplasm, which consists of numerous rounded granules of fatty and albuminoid substances imbedded in the cytoplasm.

    I. Embryology. 2. The Ovum

  • The fibrils are usually arranged in a network or reticulum, to which the term spongioplasm is applied, the clear substance in the meshes being termed hyaloplasm.

    I. Embryology. 1. The Animal Cell

  • The relative amounts of spongioplasm and hyaloplasm also vary in different cells, the latter preponderating in the young cell and the former increasing at the expense of the hyaloplasm as the cell grows.

    I. Embryology. 1. The Animal Cell

  • The former is probably of the same nature as the hyaloplasm of the cell, but the latter, which forms also the wall of the nucleus, differs from the spongioplasm of the cell substance.

    I. Embryology. 1. The Animal Cell

  • In the narrow intermediate region between the dense and the thin protoplasm, is formed a clear disk of hyaloplasm, seen as a band in lateral view.

    Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

  • The hyaloplasm which thus at first lines the spo - rangial surface of this wall soon becomes again granular by the return of its micro - somes.

    Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

  • After its formation, the hyaloplasm becomes granular, except a thin layer which remains intimately con - nected with the apex of the papilla (Fig. 7, a).

    Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

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