Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A pilot or seaman of experience, employed to assist in navigating through ice in the Arctic ocean.
  • n. An official appointed to keep the ice on a public skating-pond in order. See iceman, 3.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mr. Blanky was sitting there with his ice-master counterpart, Mr. Reid, as were Edward Little and a half dozen of the Erebus officers.

    The Terror

  • Thomas Blanky wondered if he had been an instrument of evil — or perhaps just of folly — when he had used his more than three decades of ice-master skills to get 126 men the impossible 250 miles through ice to this place where all they could do was die.

    The Terror

  • There was a weird stillness over all, and whenever the ship was moved amongst the ice-floes a curious hiss was heard; this sound is well known to all ice navigators: it is the sear of the floe against the greenheart sheathing which protects the little ship, and it is to the ice-master what the strange smell of the

    South with Scott

  • It was proposed to take six warrant officers, including carpenter, ice-master, boatswain, and chief steward.

    South with Scott

  • On board a whaler she might have advantageously replaced many an ice-master or pilot whose business it is to guide a boat amongst the ice.

    The Fur Country

  • The doctor knew enough Danish to enable him to establish a very agreeable acquaintance with them; besides, Foker, who was interpreter of the expedition, as well as ice-master, knew about twenty words of the

    The English at the North Pole Part I of the Adventures of Captain Hatteras

  • Hatteras descended upon deck, and the ice-master took his place.

    The English at the North Pole Part I of the Adventures of Captain Hatteras

  • On the 3rd of July, at 11 o'clock in the morning, the ice-master signalled land to the north.

    The English at the North Pole Part I of the Adventures of Captain Hatteras

  • Long rafts of wood, with which it was necessary to escape collision, kept the crew on the alert; the crow's nest was put in its place on the mizenmast; it consisted of a cask, in which the ice-master was partly hidden to protect him from the cold winds while he kept watch over the sea and the icebergs in view, and from which he signalled danger and sometimes gave orders to the crew.

    The English at the North Pole Part I of the Adventures of Captain Hatteras

  • The ice-master, Foker, was an experienced sailor, and, like Johnson, was capable of rendering important service.

    The English at the North Pole Part I of the Adventures of Captain Hatteras

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.