Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. That cannot be mitigated: immitigable circumstances.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. That cannot be mitigated

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Not capable of being mitigated, softened, or appeased.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not mitigable; incapable of being mitigated or appeased.

Etymologies

im- +‎ mitigable (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Calista, I swear to thee, by the spotlessness of thy own soul, by the brilliancy of thy immitigable eyes, by everything pure and chaste in heaven and in thy own heart, that I will never cease from following thee!

    The Memoires of Barry Lyndon

  • Her main fault was a brooding, eternal, immitigable suspicion of all men, things, creeds, and parties; this suspicion was a mist before her eyes, a false guide in her path, wherever she looked, wherever she turned.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • It was, indeed, Rima returned to tell me that I that loved her had been more cruel to her than her cruellest enemies; for they had but tortured and destroyed her body with fire, while I had cast this shadow on her soul — this sorrow transcending all sorrows, darker than death, immitigable, eternal.

    Green Mansions

  • ‘And going upstairs I could not raise my foot against the immitigable apple tree with its silver leaves held stiff.’

    The Waves

  • I will stand for one moment beneath the immitigable tree, alone with the man whose throat is cut, while downstairs the cook shoves in and out the dampers.

    The Waves

  • There were the floating, pale - grey clouds; and the immitigable tree; the implacable tree with its greaved silver bark.

    The Waves

  • But we are doomed, all of us, by the apple trees, by the immitigable tree which we cannot pass.

    The Waves

  • His wife was the daughter of a laundress, in whose house he had lodged thirty years ago, when new to London but already long-acquainted with hunger; they lived in complete harmony, but Mrs Hinks, who was four years the elder, still spoke the laundress tongue, unmitigated and immitigable.

    New Grub Street

  • He was intent on an audacious, immitigable, and supernatural revenge.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Now, in the stillness, is heard the long, melancholy note of a bird, complaining above of some wrong or sorrow that man, or her own kind, or the immitigable doom of mortal affairs, has inflicted upon her, the complaining, but unresisting sufferer.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 109, November, 1866

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