Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cause or permit to enter; introduce or admit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To intermeddle with the effects or goods of another.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To intermeddle with the effects or goods of another.
  • transitive v. To send in or put in; to insert or introduce.
  • transitive v. To allow to pass in; to admit.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To send or put in; insert or introduce within.
  • To allow to enter; be the medium by which a thing enters.
  • In Scots and old English law, to interfere with the effects of another.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. allow to enter; grant entry to

Etymologies

Middle English intromitten, to deal illegally with others, from Latin intrōmittere, to send in, let into : intrō-, in; see en in Indo-European roots + mittere, to send.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • You were to learn what you could of the Pretender's movements, and incidentally you were to intromit with certain of our settled agents at Versailles.

    Doom Castle

  • He who never intromits at all, will never intromit with fraudulent intentions.

    Life Of Johnson

  • ` ` Truly, my honest friend, '' said Dalgetty, ` ` if that is your best recommendation to Sir Duncan's favour, I would pretermit my pleading thereupon, in respect I have observed that even the animal creation are incensed against those who intromit with their offspring forcibly, much more any rational and

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Mrs. Tappitt had frequently offered to intromit the ceremony when calling upon his generosity for other purposes, but the September gift had always been forthcoming.

    Rachel Ray, volume 1

  • Mrs Tappitt had frequently offered to intromit the ceremony when calling upon his generosity for other purposes, but the September gift had always been forthcoming.

    Rachel Ray

  • Surrogating and substituting the said Gilbert Burns my brother and his foresaids in my full right, title, room and place of the whole premises, with power to him to intromit with, and dispose upon the same at pleasure, and in general to do every other thing in the premises that I could have done myself before granting hereof, but always with and under the conditions before expressed.

    The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. With a New Life of the Poet, and Notices, Critical and Biographical by Allan Cunningham

  • "Qui sibi bene temperat in licitis," says one of the fathers, "nunquam cadet in illicita:" he who never intromits at all, will never intromit with fraudulent intentions.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 05 Miscellaneous Pieces

  • The temptation to intromit is frequent and strong; so strong and so frequent, as to require the utmost activity of justice, and vigilance of caution, to withstand its prevalence; and the method by which a man may entitle himself to legal intromission, is so open and so facile, that to neglect it is a proof of fraudulent intention: for why should a man omit to do (but for reasons which he will not confess,) that which he can do so easily, and that which he knows to be required by the law?

    Life Of Johnson

  • “Truly, my honest friend,” said Dalgetty, “if that is your best recommendation to Sir Duncan’s favour, I would pretermit my pleading thereupon, in respect I have observed that even the animal creation are incensed against those who intromit with their offspring forcibly, much more any rational and Christian creatures, who have had violence done upon their small family.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • The temptation to intromit is frequent and strong; so strong, and so frequent, as to require the utmost activity of justice, and vigilance of caution, to withstand its prevalence: and the method by which a man may entitle himself to legal intromission, is so open and so facile, that to neglect it is a proof of fraudulent intention; for why should a man omit to do (but for reasons which he will not confess) that which he can do so easily, and that which he knows to be required by the law?

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 05 Miscellaneous Pieces

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.