Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A proposition, scheme, or treatise designed to promote peace, especially in the church.
  • n. The deacon's litany or great synapte at the beginning of the liturgy of the Orthodox Church.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A proposition or device for securing peace, especially in the church.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A proposition, scheme, or treatise designed to promote peace, especially in the church.
  • n. plural The deacon's litany (diaconica) or great synapte at the beginning of the liturgy of the Greek Church: named from the petitions “In peace let us pray of the Lord … For the peace from above … For the peace of the whole world … let us pray, etc.” (response “Kyrie eleison”), with which it opens.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then, training up a band of disciples, he sent them forth proclaiming the new irenicon.

    The Religions of Japan From the Dawn of History to the Era of Méiji

  • The opinions frankly expressed as to theology, metaphysics, and many established orthodoxies; its conclusion, glowing in every page, that metaphysics, as Danton said of the Revolution, was devouring its own children, and led to self-annihilation; its proclamation of Comte as the legitimate issue of all previous philosophy and positive philosophy as its ultimate _irenicon_ -- all this, one might think, would have condemned such a book from its birth.

    George Eliot; a Critical Study of Her Life, Writings & Philosophy

  • As it was, it remained the half - uttered _irenicon_ of a few speculative spirits.

    The Life of John Milton Volume 3 1643-1649

  • Oh! that God would in His providence hasten the time when some irenicon may be found, and it can be truly said of our country,

    Tupelo

  • As it was, it remained the half - uttered irenicon of a few speculative spirits.

    The Life of John Milton

  • The opinions frankly expressed as to theology, metaphysics, and many established orthodoxies; its conclusion, glowing in every page, that metaphysics, as Danton said of the Revolution, was devouring its own children, and led to self-annihilation; its proclamation of Comte as the legitimate issue of all previous philosophy and positive philosophy as its ultimate irenicon ” all this, one might think, would have condemned such a book from its birth.

    George Eliot; A Critical Study of Her Life, Writings and Philosophy

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