Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See jungle-fowl.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The common jungle-cock of India (Gallus bankiva) was found here, and furnished us with some excellent meals; but we could get no deer.

    The Malay Archipelago

  • Frank was thinking of her next day as he was standing on the Mess verandah after tea, cleaning his fowling-piece, when on a wooded spur running down from the mountains and sheltering the little station on the west he heard a jungle-cock crowing in the undergrowth not four hundred yards away.

    The Jungle Girl

  • Deer, jungle-cock, wild hogs, and cattle are to be found in the plains and forests near the lake.

    The Great White Tribe in Filipinia

  • Soon after reveille the men are mustered, armed with picks and shovels in the place of the more customary "Krag," and long before the tropic sun has risen over the primeval woods, the chatter of monkeys and the crow of jungle-cock is mingled with the crash of trees, the click of shovels and the rumble of the dump-cart.

    The Great White Tribe in Filipinia

  • And the big brown elephant catchers, the trackers and drivers and ropers, and the men who know all the secrets of breaking the wildest elephants, passed him from one to the other, and they marked his forehead with blood from the breast of a newly killed jungle-cock, to show that he was a forester, initiated and free of all the jungles.

    The Jungle Book

  • I shot a jungle-cock, and was quite disappointed at finding him

    Here, There and Everywhere

  • The so-called "jungle-cock" in a "Jock Scott" fly is furnished by a bird found, I believe, only round Madras.

    Here, There and Everywhere

  • It had brown wings, a dark body, and a piece of jungle-cock feather, and it was fastened to a sea-trout casting-line.

    Angling Sketches

  • The common jungle-cock (Gallus bankiva) was also obtained here.

    The Malay Archipelago, the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise; a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature — Volume 1

  • Bees full of industry flew abroad, and glittering beetles crawled along the moist grass, then crows, chattering paroquets, and long-legged cranes took to the wing, while the jungle-cock, the dial-bird, the yellow oriole, the grass warbler, and bronze-winged pigeons sent their varied and ringing notes through the forest.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

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