Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act or process of making a lattice of, or of fitting a lattice to.
  • n. A system of bars crossing in the middle to form braces between principal longitudinal members, as of a strut.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act or process of making a lattice of, or of fitting a lattice to.
  • n. A system of bars crossing in the middle to form braces between principal longitudinal members, as of a strut.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In structural work, particularly bridge work, the system of slender diagonal members which connect the two opposite parallel members or flanges of a structural iron or steel beam, column, or strut, and which are arranged in two or more distinct, continuous, zigzag lines, the bars of one line crossing those of the other: in distinction from lacing, in which the adjacent bars form a single consecutive, zigzag line, no two bars crossing one another.

Etymologies

lattice +‎ -ing (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Mexican fashion, the roof supported on stout poles, and then mudded walls were built up on arrowweed latticing.

    Mormon Settlement in Arizona A Record of Peaceful Conquest of the Desert

  • They may see the scaffolding of the great shipyards latticing themselves against the sky, and the granite quarries against the hills.

    The Old Coast Road From Boston to Plymouth

  • He was completely hidden, except in front, where the wicker latticing did not extend.

    The Radio Boys on the Mexican Border

  • Through the latticing of the girders the great buildings on the northern bank showed up for a moment against the light beyond, dark and somber masses with nicked and serrated tops, then, the river crossed, nearer buildings intervened to cut off the view, and the train plunged into the maze and wilderness of South London.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate

  • The nation displayed their love to Charles the Second, by latticing the forests.

    An History of Birmingham (1783)

  • The once immaculate suit of white clothing was now deeply soiled and stained by contact with the earth and grass, and was a mere wrapping of scarcely recognisable rags, the coat being missing altogether, while great rents in the remaining garments revealed the protruding ribs and the shrunken limbs, the colour of the yellowish-brown skin being almost completely obscured by the latticing of long and deep blood-smeared scratches that mutely told how desperately the man had fought his way through all obstacles in his headlong, panic-stricken flight; his finger nails were broken and ragged; his boots were cut and torn to pieces to such an extent that they afforded scarcely any protection to his feet; and his once iron - grey hair and moustache, as well as his short growth of stubbly beard, were almost perfectly white.

    Harry Escombe A Tale of Adventure in Peru

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