Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of lessen.
  • adj. Having been lessened.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. decreased in severity; made less harsh
  • adj. impaired by diminution

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These became more violent as the rain lessened, and, so absolutely were we centred in this electrical maelstrom, there was no connecting any chain or flash or fork of lightning with any particular thunder-clap.

    CHAPTER XXVIII

  • The pain lessened on Sunday, and the lethargy increased.

    Still Extant

  • Laperrieri was disheartened he didn't get his 100th Sunday, but the win lessened the disappointed.

    USATODAY.com - Hockey - Vancouver vs. Colorado

  • Government business strains and other concerns preoccupied Canadians and the development of the Pacific Basin lessened somewhat the European connection, at least from a trade standpoint.

    North to Canada: An American Investment Banker Looks At Canada Today

  • But Hilda's face softened not; no gleam of tenderness mitigated the hard lustre of her eyes; her expression lessened not from its set purpose.

    The Cryptogram A Novel

  • These became more violent as the rain lessened, and, so absolutely were we centred in this electrical maelstrom, there was no connecting any chain or flash or fork of lightning with any particular thunder - clap.

    Chapter 28

  • The patter of the rain lessened and grew still; a sweet reviving air blew in at the windows.

    Melbourne House

  • The word lessened does not convey a sufficient idea of what experience has proved to be true, to the honour of our excellent soldiers.

    Memoirs Correspondence and Manuscripts of General Lafayette

  • In a weak attempt to lighten the situation, his painful expression lessened into a grimace but not quite a smile.

    Vince Flynn Collectors’ Edition #2

  • Where you saw nothing else, you would have leisure to remark all the defects; which would increase in proportion as the novelty lessened, which is always a great charm.

    Lady Mary Wortley Montague

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