Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • He looks at the word libertas through his spectacles; -- can't understand, being a thoroughly good antiquary, [1] how such a virtue, or privilege, could honestly be carved with approval in the twelfth century; -- rubs his spectacles; rubs the inscription, to make sure of its every letter; stamps it, to make surer still; -- and at last, though in a greatly bewildered state of mind, remains convinced that here is a sculpture of 'La Liberte' in the twelfth century.

    Val d'Arno

  • The Latin word libertas is expressed by either, depending upon the translator.

    Pope Leo XIII on True Liberty

  • Ideas and attitudes associated with the Enlightenment gave the idea of libertas a rational and contemporary context.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • This was called libertas Decembrica, because formerly in

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 5: Diocese-Fathers of Mercy

  • When spontaneity takes a useful, generous, or beneficent direction, it is called libertas; when, on the contrary, it takes a harmful, vicious, base, or evil direction, it is called libido.

    System of Economical Contradictions: or, the Philosophy of Misery

  • Other kernel improvements include: DSP firmware load support, faster SD driver with SDIO support, SDIO Wi-Fi support through "libertas" driver, booting and rootfs in NAND flash with JFFS2, and improvements to various device drivers.

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  • 'libertas' of Chartres and Westminster is to the 'liberty' of M. Victor

    Val d'Arno

  • The liberal idea, at least in today's usage, has little to do with its root libertas or its classic meaning of tolerating differences in the name of liberty.

    "Love Me, Love Me, Love Me, I'm a Liberal."

  • Some republicans would add representation, the separation of powers, or equality of material possessions, to protect public liberty libertas and avoid Rome's eventual descent into popular tyranny and military despotism.

    Sellers on The Origins of Republican Legal Theory

  • [5800] In taking a dowry thou losest thy liberty, dos intrat, libertas exit, hazardest thine estate.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

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