Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To intrust; trust to (someone/something).
  • v. To trust; to expect; to depend or rely (on).

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To intrust.
  • To trust; rely or depend: with to or on: as, do not lippen to him; I was lippening on you.

Etymologies

From Middle English lipnen ("to trust"), of obscure origin. Perhaps an alteration of Middle English litnen ("to trust"), of North Germanic origin, compare Swedish lita ("to trust, depend, rely on"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Then truth surely shall be tint, and none shall lippen to other;

    Castle Dangerous

  • So, I knowing the people to pe unchancy, and not to lippen to, and hearing a pibroch in the wood, I pegan to pid my lads look to their flints, and then —

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • I jaloused him, sir, no to be the friend to government he pretends: the family are not to lippen to.

    Old Mortality

  • "I winna gar ye sweir, for I wad lippen to yer aith no a hair."

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 15, No. 85, January, 1875

  • "She has naebody, ye ken, my lord, 'at ye wad like to lippen her wi'."

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 15, No. 85, January, 1875

  • _ A generic term for several containing vessels, as _bee-lippen_, _lie-lip_, _seed-lip_,

    The Dialect of the West of England; Particularly Somersetshire

  • Na, I had far rather Tib Mumps kenn’d which way I was gaun than her—though Tib’s no muckle to lippen to neither, and I would advise ye on no account to stay in the house a’ night.

    Chapter XXII

  • When James Guthrie was lying ill and like to die, he called in his man, James Cowie, to read in the Epistle to the Romans to him, and when Cowie came to these words, 'I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy,' his master burst into tears, and said, 'James, I have nothing but that to lippen to.'

    Samuel Rutherford

  • The intimacy and tenderness of the minister and his man went on deeper and grew closer, till at the end we find Cowie reading to him at his own request the Epistle to the Romans, and when the reader came to the passage, 'I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy,' the listener burst into tears, and exclaimed, 'James, James, halt there, for I have nothing but that to lippen to.'

    Samuel Rutherford

  • "I would lippen to Eli's word-ay, if it was the Chevalier, or Appin himsel '," he added.

    David Balfour, a sequel to Kidnapped.

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