Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To separate (the metals in an alloy) by melting the more fusible constituents while leaving the less fusible ones solid.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To separate by fusion, as a more fusible from a less fusible material.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To melt; to become liquid.
  • transitive v. To separate by fusion, as a more fusible from a less fusible material.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To melt; liquefy; specifically, in metallurgy, to separate, as one metal from another less fusible, by applying just sufficient heat to melt the more easily liquefiable, so that it can be run off from the other. Also eliquate.
  • To become liquefied or dissolved; melt.

Etymologies

Latin liquāre, liquāt-, to melt.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • However, notwithstanding the use of cupro-manganese, the tin, as in ordinary bronzes, has a tendency to liquate in those portions of the mould which are the hottest, and which become solid the last, especially in the case of moulds having a great width.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 315, January 14, 1882

  • SFC has also secured the right to compel Westinghouse to hand over all unsold products loaded with BusyBox for donation to charity. they may be legally required to liquate the remaining merchandise before they comply with this particular court order.

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