Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A pair of boards shutting together like a book, formerly used instead of a log-slate.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “The harder it blows, and the faster she goes,” the merrier are they; “strong gales and squally” is the item they love best to chalk on the log-board; and even when the oldest top-men begin to hesitate about lying out on the yard to gather in the flapping remnants of the torn canvas, these gallant youngsters glory in the opportunity of setting an example of what a gentleman sailor can perform.

    The Lieutenant and Commander

  • O'Brien reported the rate of sailing to the master, marked it down on the log-board, and then returned.

    Peter Simple

  • Captain Wilson did as she requested, and writing in chalk "all well" in large letters upon the log-board, held it over the side as he passed close to the Portsmouth.

    The Settlers in Canada

  • Lumley made the same reply on the log-board of the Portsmouth, and Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were satisfied.

    The Settlers in Canada

  • Captain Wilson did as she requested, and writing in chalk "all well" in large letters upon the log-board, held it over the side as he passed close to the

    The Settlers in Canada

  • Alfred was not on deck -- fever had compelled him to remain in his hammock -- but Captain Lumley made the same reply on the log-board of the _Portsmouth_, and Mr and Mrs Campbell were satisfied.

    The Settlers in Canada

  • "I have them," replied I, "and we may as well put them down on the log-board: -- North Foreland Light Nor'-Nor'-West and a quarter West.

    Poor Jack

  • "I have them," replied I, "and we may as well put them down on the log-board -- North Foreland Light N.N.W. 1/4 W.

    Poor Jack

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