Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Nautical, a double slate, marked and ruled on its inner side, like a log-book, on which the log is first recorded.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I opened and shut a drawer under my desk, on which a filled-up log-slate lay wide open in its wooden frame waiting to be copied neatly into the sort of book I was accustomed to write with care, the ship's log-book.

    A Personal Record

  • That night, lying flat on her back on the deck with a quadrant to her eye, she "got a star and brought it down to the horizon," and sat up under the reeking lamp in the cabin nearly the whole night ciphering and ciphering till she had filled up the four sides of the log-slate with her calculations.

    Moran of the Lady Letty

  • The last entry on the log-slate had been made at eight o'clock on the previous morning; and the log-book had been written-up as far as noon on the day preceding that.

    The Missing Merchantman

  • He succeeded in finding the log-book, log-slate, and the captain's desk, with all of which he proceeded on board the _Flying Cloud_.

    The Missing Merchantman

  • At three in the morning the yacht was off the island of Sirhassen, of which a note was made on the log-slate.

    Four Young Explorers or, Sight-Seeing in the Tropics

  • The Blanchita passed Cape Datu at ten in the evening, and the second mate made a note of it on the log-slate.

    Four Young Explorers or, Sight-Seeing in the Tropics

  • Then he went to the wheel, and read the entries made on the log-slate.

    Four Young Explorers or, Sight-Seeing in the Tropics

  • The wind continued to blow fresh from the south and south-west during the rest of the day and the succeeding night; and the log-slate showed ten and eleven knots until midnight, when the wind hauled round to the westward, and soon came strong from that quarter.

    Outward Bound Or, Young America Afloat

  • The log indicated that the ship was making six knots an hour, the rate being ascertained every two hours, and entered on the log-slate, to be used in making up the "dead reckoning."

    Outward Bound Or, Young America Afloat

  • The first sea day would end at twelve o'clock on the morrow, when the log-slate would indicate the total of nautical miles the ship had run after taking her departure.

    Outward Bound Or, Young America Afloat

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