Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Plus, it enables you to indulge in ultralazy typing while slouched back in your superplush man-devouring recliner.

    The World's Weirdest Keyboards

  • I recalled some of the Indian beliefs, especially that of the mis-shapen, man-devouring monster who is said to beguile his victims into the dark forest by mimicking the human voice — the voice sometimes of a woman in distress — or by singing some strange and beautiful melody.

    Green Mansions

  • They say, of all animals the lion is the chief; and of beasts the ass is the meanest; yet, with the concurrence of the wise, the burden-bearing ass is preferable to the man-devouring lion.

    The Persian Literature, Comprising The Shah Nameh, The Rubaiyat, The Divan, and The Gulistan, Volume 2

  • -- Face to face meek as a lamb, behind your back like a man-devouring wolf.

    The Persian Literature, Comprising The Shah Nameh, The Rubaiyat, The Divan, and The Gulistan, Volume 2

  • To be sure, this "actress-lady" was making-believe she was a wild thing, and she was doing it almighty well, but Joan had been the reality, and grave and still, part of his own big, grave, mountain country, not a fierce, man-devouring animal of the tropics.

    The Branding Iron

  • Destiny aimed an evil stroke when Burke, whose whole soul was bound up in order, peace, and gently enlarged precedent, found himself face to face with the portentous man-devouring Sphinx.

    Burke

  • It is men of his type -- and not Marat or Robespierre -- who made the revolution, who goaded the people of France into becoming something worse than man-devouring beasts.

    The Bronze Eagle A Story of the Hundred Days

  • It may be noted here that the Persian ghol is the loup-garou of Europe, the man-devouring demon of the woods.

    Tales of the Punjab

  • He spoke of me all the time, in the blandest way, as "this prodigious giant," and "this horrible sky-towering monster," and "this tusked and taloned man-devouring ogre", and everybody took in all this bosh in the naivest way, and never smiled or seemed to notice that there was any discrepancy between these watered statistics and me.

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

  • - The word used was the Arabic _ghûl_ (in English usually ghowl or ghoul), the vampire, man-devouring demon, which corresponds to the _bhût_ and _pret_, the malignant ghosts of the Hindus.

    Tales of the Punjab

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