Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having a mandible or mandibles.
  • n. An insect having mandibles.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Provided with mandibles adapted for biting, as many insects.
  • n. An insect having mandibles

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Provided with mandibles adapted for biting, as many insects.
  • n. An insect having mandibles.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In entomology
  • Having mandibles, and thus able to bite, as an insect; of or pertaining to the Mandibulata: distinguished from haustellate or suctorial.
  • Masticatory, as the jaws of an insect.
  • Having a lower jaw, as nearly all vertebrates: opposed to emandibulate.
  • n. A mandibulate insect, as a beetle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having mandibles

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mallophaga: wool-eaters: an ordinal term applied to biting lice: wingless: mandibulate; thoracic segments similar; no metamorphosis: = Lipoptera.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Maxilla: without any qualifying adjective, the second pair of jaws in a mandibulate insect; the most persistent when the mouth is modified, and represented by some functional part in all insects in which the mouth structures are useful: second maxillae, = the labium, or third pair of jaws in a mandibulate insect.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Platyptera: flat and broad-winged: an ordinal term applied to insects with four net-veined wings, secondaries longitudinally folded beneath primaries; mouth mandibulate; prothorax free; transformations complete: Psocidae, Termitidae, Perlidae and Mallophaga.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Isoptera: equal winged: an ordinal term for insects with four, similar, net-veined wings; mouth mandibulate; thoracic rings similar, loosely jointed metamorphosis incomplete: the Termitidae.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Coleoptera: sheath-winged: an order with the primaries coriaceous, used as a cover only, meeting in a straight line dorsally; mouth mandibulate; pro-thorax free; transformation complete: the beetles: the term has also been applied to the two elytra together.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Plecoptera or Plectoptera: plaited winged: an ordinal term applied to net-veined insects in which the secondaries are longitudinally folded beneath primaries; mouth mandibulate; body loosely jointed; prothorax free; metamorphosis incomplete: the term Plecoptera was used by Brauer for Perlidae; Plectoptera by Packard for the

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Labium: the lower lip: a compound structure which forms the floor of the mouth in mandibulate insects, behind the first maxilla and opposed to the labium; formed by a fusion in embryonic life of separate right and left maxilla-like halves: in some of its developments referred to as the tongue.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Mecoptera: long-winged: neuropterous insects with similar, large, unfolded wings; mouth mandibulate, prolonged into a beak: head free; thorax agglutinated; transformations complete: the scorpion flies or Panorpidae.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Ephemerida: May-flies: an ordinal term used for insects with net-veined wings, held vertically when at rest, not folded; mouth mandibulate, not functionally developed: thorax loosely agglutinated; abdomen with anal filaments: metamorphosis incomplete.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • Hymenoptera: membrane-winged: an ordinal term applied to insects with four membranous wings with few veins, the anterior usually larger than the posterior; mouth mandibulate; head free; thorax agglutinate, transformations complete.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

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