Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of marlinespike.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a pointed iron hand tool that is used to separate strands of a rope or cable (as in splicing)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And that hapless son of Ham, who happened to be just crossing the main-deck, heard a marlingspike, which by ill luck was lying at hand, flying past his ears.

    Westward Ho!

  • His face was an exceedingly round but sober one; he was dressed in a faded blue woolen frock or shirt, and patched trowsers; and had thus far been dividing his attention between a marlingspike he held in one hand, and a pill-box held in the other, occasionally casting a critical glance at the ivory limbs of the two crippled captains.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • He drew out a small marlingspike which he carried in a sheath at his hip, and, bending over the flagstone, felt for the notch; found it, inserted the point, and began to prise, glancing, as he worked, over his shoulder at the windows of the house.

    The Mayor of Troy

  • The place before is full of the sound of the hammer tapping the silver on the marlingspike.

    Life of John Coleridge Patteson

  • Groves of rigging were about the chains; and there, peering from behind a great stay, like an Indian from behind a hemlock, a Spanish sailor, a marlingspike in his hand, was seen, who made what seemed an imperfect gesture towards the balcony, but immediately as if alarmed by some advancing step along the deck within, vanished into the recesses of the hempen forest, like a poacher.

    The Piazza Tales

  • His face was an exceedingly round but sober one; he was dressed in a faded blue woollen frock or shirt, and patched trowsers; and had thus far been dividing his attention between a marlingspike he held in one hand, and a pill-box held in the other, occasionally casting a critical glance at the ivory limbs of the two crippled captains.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • But I had no hand in shipping that ivory arm there; that thing is against all rule "-- pointing at it with the marlingspike --" that is the captain's work, not mine; he ordered the carpenter to make it; he had that club-hammer there put to the end, to knock some one's brains out with, I suppose, as he tried mine once.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • But I had no hand in shipping that ivory arm there; that thing is against all rule '-- pointing at it with the marlingspike --' that is the captain's work, not mine; he ordered the carpenter to make it; he had that club-hammer there put to the end, to knock some one's brains out with, I suppose, as he tried mine once.

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • We took the wrong road, and in turning about split one of our shafts, but Braisted served it with some spare rope, using the hatchet-handle as a marlingspike, so that it held stoutly all the rest of the way to Stockholm.

    Northern Travel Summer and Winter Pictures of Sweden, Denmark and Lapland

  • But I had no hand in shipping that ivory arm there; that thing is against all rule” — pointing at it with the marlingspike — “that is the captain’s work, not mine; he ordered the carpenter to make it; he had that club-hammer there put to the end, to knock some one’s brains out with, I suppose, as he tried mine once.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

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