Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A membrane, especially one of the three membranes enclosing the brain and spinal cord in vertebrates.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a membrane, especially one of the three membranes enclosing the brain and spinal cord in vertebrates

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In anatomy, a membrane; especially, one of the three membranes that invest the brain and spinal cord.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a membrane (one of 3) that envelops the brain and spinal cord

Etymologies

Greek mēninx.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Ancient Greek μήνιγξ (mēninx, "skin, membrane; lees of wine") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Each vein of the other pair stretches from the region of the ear to the brain, and branches off in a number of fine and delicate veins into the so-called meninx, or membrane, which surrounds the brain.

    The History of Animals

  • “Dimágh,” a Persianism when used for the head: the word properly means brain or meninx.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • But if you perceive that fever is coming on, and that any of these symptoms accompany it, you must not put off, but having sawed the bone to the membrane (meninx), or scraped it with a raspatory (and it is then easily sawed or scraped), you must apply the other treatment as may seem proper, attention being paid to circumstances.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • The bone at the middle of the head is double, the hardest and most compact part being the upper portion, where it is connected with the skin, and the lowest, where it is connected with the meninx (dura mater); and from the uppermost and lowermost parts the bone gradually becomes softer and less compact, till you come to the diploe.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • And and there is another danger if you saw the bone down to the meninx and remove it at once, lest in the act of sawing you should wound the meninx.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • But if you have not charge of the treatment from the first, but undertake it from another after a time, you must saw the bone at once down to the meninx with a serrated trepan, and in doing so must frequently take out the trepan and examine with a sound (specillum), and otherwise along the tract of the instrument.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • The same thing applies to the membrane which surrounds the brain: for when, by sawing the bone, and removing it from the meninx, you lay the latter bare, you must make it clean and dry as quickly as possible, lest being in a moist state for a considerable time, it become soaked therewith and swelled; for when these things occur, there is danger of its mortifying.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • If you have had the management of the case from the first, you must not at once saw the bone down to the meninx; for it is not proper that the membrane should be laid bare and exposed to injuries for a length of time, as in the end it may become it may become fungous.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • [FN#221] Text "Dimágh," a Persianism when used for the head: the word properly means brain or meninx.

    Arabian nights. English

  • "Another problem is that the tumor often exerts pressure on the meninx so that, when it is opened for surgery, the tumor shifts or changes its shape."

    Science Blog - Science news straight from the source

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