Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The part of the mesentery that attaches the colon to the abdominal wall

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The fold of peritoneum, or mesentery, attached to the colon.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The mesentery of the colon; the peritoneal fold which holds the colon in place.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. mesentery that holds the lower colon to the dorsal abdominal wall

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The portion of this mesentery attached to the greater curvature of the stomach is named the dorsal mesogastrium, and the part which suspends the colon is termed the mesocolon (Fig. 985).

    XI. Splanchnology. 2. The Digestive Apparatus

  • The Middle Colic Artery (a. colica media) arises from the superior mesenteric just below the pancreas and, passing downward and forward between the layers of the transverse mesocolon, divides into two branches, right and left; the former anastomoses with the right colic; the latter with the left colic, a branch of the inferior mesenteric.

    VI. The Arteries. 5a. 2. The Abdominal Aorta

  • It crosses the left common iliac artery and is continued into the lesser pelvis under the name of the superior hemorrhoidal artery, which descends between the two layers of the sigmoid mesocolon and ends on the upper part of the rectum.

    VI. The Arteries. 5a. 2. The Abdominal Aorta

  • The ascending branch crosses in front of the left kidney and ends, between the two layers of the transverse mesocolon, by anastomosing with the middle colic artery; the descending branch anastomoses with the highest sigmoid artery.

    VI. The Arteries. 5a. 2. The Abdominal Aorta

  • Diagrams to illustrate the development of the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon.

    Illustrations. Fig. 990

  • The inferior mesenteric glands (Fig. 617) consist of: (a) small glands on the branches of the left colic and sigmoid arteries; (b) a group in the sigmoid mesocolon, around the superior hemorrhoidal artery; and (c) a pararectal group in contact with the muscular coat of the rectum.

    VIII. The Lymphatic System. 6. The Lymphatics of the Abdomen and Pelvis

  • The Postero-inferior Surface is in relation with the diaphragm, the spleen, the left suprarenal gland, the upper part of the front of the left kidney, the anterior surface of the pancreas, the left colic flexure, and the upper layer of the transverse mesocolon.

    XI. Splanchnology. 1F. The Stomach

  • The transverse mesocolon separates the stomach from the duodenojejunal flexure and small intestine.

    XI. Splanchnology. 1F. The Stomach

  • The Mesocolic Glands (lymphoglandulæ mesocolicæ) are numerous, and lie between the layers of the transverse mesocolon, in close relation to the transverse colon; they are best developed in the neighborhood of the right and left colic flexures.

    VIII. The Lymphatic System. 6. The Lymphatics of the Abdomen and Pelvis

  • The anterior layer of the transverse mesocolon is at first distinct from the posterior layer of the greater omentum, but ultimately the two blend, and hence the greater omentum appears as if attached to the transverse colon (Fig. 990).

    XI. Splanchnology. 2. The Digestive Apparatus

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