Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The middle of the leg.
  • n. In entomology, one of the intermediate or second pair of legs of an insect.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If not careful, its midleg length can do which of the following shape killers?

    Before You Put That On

  • Inset yokes in the back combined with midleg vertical seams trick the eye and make your butt appear smaller.

    “I Don’t Have a Thing to Wear”

  • On either side were great forests of mangrove trees, standing tiptoe on their myriad down-dropping roots, each root midleg in the water.

    Euphemia Among the Pelicans

  • When his joy had a little subsided, he stepped into the sea; ten miles at the first stride, which brought him midleg deep; and ten miles at the second, when the water came just above his knees; and ten miles more at the third, by which he was immersed nearly to his waist.

    Myths That Every Child Should Know A Selection Of The Classic Myths Of All Times For Young People

  • His terror of the sea, although conquered for the moment, was still undiminished; had the sea been a lake of living flames, he could not have shrunk more panically from its touch; and once, when his foot slipped and he plunged to the midleg into a pool of water, the shriek that came up out of his soul was like the cry of death.

    Merry Men

  • Certainly not the blue heron, standing midleg deep in the water, obviously catching cold in a reckless disregard of wet feet and consequences; nor the mournful curlew, the dejected plover, or the low-spirited snipe, who saw fit to join him in his suicidal contemplation; nor the impassive kingfisher -- an ornithological Marius

    The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales With Condensed Novels, Spanish and American Legends, and Earlier Papers

  • They had to climb a mountain with snow to the midleg, which increased their painful toil.

    Astoria, or Anecdotes of an Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains

  • Certainly not the blue peron standing midleg deep in the water, obviously catching cold in a reckless disregard of wet feet and consequences; nor the mournful curlew, the dejected plover, or the low-spirited snipe, who saw fit to join him in his suicidal contemplation; nor the impassive kingfisher — an ornithological Marius — reviewing the desolate expanse; nor the black raven that went to and fro over the face of the marsh continually, but evidently could n't make up his mind whether the waters had subsided, and felt low-spirited in the reflection that, after all this trouble, he would n't be able to give a definite answer.

    The luck of Roaring Camp, and other sketches

  • English, however, do not seem to know how enjoyable the momentary gleams of their summer are; they call it broiling weather, and hurry to the seaside with red, perspiring faces, in a state of combustion and deliquescence; and I have observed that even their cattle have similar susceptibilities, seeking the deepest shade, or standing midleg deep in pools and streams to cool themselves, at temperatures which our own cows would deem little more than barely comfortable.

    Our Old Home A Series of English Sketches A Series of English Sketches

  • 40 Masser or Nile of Egypt, is fullest in the month of August, when it overflows in some places where the banks are low; the water which overflows is seldom above midleg; the banks are covered with reeds, with which they make mats.

    An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa

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