Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A horse (often blind) used to turn a mill.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To say the truth, but for the beautiful Menie Gray, I should feel like a mill-horse, walking my daily round in this dull country, while other gay rovers are trying how the world will receive them.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • And what a couple of old patriarchs shall we become, going in the mill-horse round; getting sons and daughters; providing nurses for them first, governors and governesses next; teaching them lessons their fathers never practised, nor which their mother, as her parents will say, was much the better for!

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • When they had gone, without even glancing up into the tall oak-tree, he came down, and rode away from the wood on an old mill-horse, with his friends the wood-cutters walking beside him to take care of him as best they could.

    True Stories of Wonderful Deeds Pictures and Stories for Little Folk

  • Roland is a great personage, an honest nobody, a mill-horse at the wheel of office.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 343, May 1844

  • Their strength lies in their political blindness, like the mill-horse that thinks that he is moving up when really he is only pushing down the belt-wheel.

    My Life

  • He did his little daily task like a mill-horse, who goes round and round with his eyes bandaged, not knowing what work he is doing.

    Madame Bovary

  • But I had achieved a frigate and a Princess, and that was not so bad for a beginning, and more than enough to show off with before those dull unadventurous folk who continued on their mill-horse round at home.

    Dream Days

  • Princess, and that was not so bad for a beginning, and more than enough to show off with before those dull unadventurous folk who continued on their mill-horse round at home.

    Dream Days

  • And the time of night being come, the king was impatient of delay; but his feet were sore from the rough shoes he had worn on his journey, so that he was scarce able to walk; therefore he was mounted on Humphrey's mill-horse, and, the four loyal brothers forming a guard, they directed their way towards Moseley.

    Royalty Restored

  • He was, at least, a far more interesting personage than an old official mill-horse like Uncle Frederick.

    Tales of Two Countries

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