Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having the shape of a miter: said especially of a form of head-dress worn by women in the middle of the fifteenth century.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With their miter-shaped headwear and their faces fully veiled, when you notice these puppeteers -- and it's part of this theater's craft how soon one almost forgets they're there -- they can suggest penitents in Christian processions.

    A Modern Master's Past and Present

  • The cardinal had donned his miter-shaped helmet at the first sign of the Filippeschi, and Simon could not see his face.

    The Saracen: Land of the Infidel

  • My eye followed the light cloud of her smoke, now here, now there, above the plain, according to the devious curves of the stream, but always fainter and farther away, till I lost it at last behind the miter-shaped hill of the great pagodas.

    The Secret Sharer

  • My eye followed the light cloud of her smoke, now here, now there, above the plain, according to the devious curves of the stream, but always fainter and farther away, till I lost it at last behind the miter-shaped hill of the great pagoda.

    The Secret Sharer

  • In one respect she was treated worse than a felon; for whereas she was on her way to be sentenced by the civil arm, she already bore her judgment inscribed in advance upon a miter-shaped cap which she wore:

    Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc — Volume 2

  • This unusual Roman Catholic weapon is evidently related to the French miter-shaped, multiple-barreled machine-gun of 1870 known as une mitrailleuse.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XIII No 1

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