Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek antiquity, the guardian of a temple: in some cases merely a janitor or temple-sweeper, in others a priestly officer of much dignity, having charge of the treasures dedicated in the temple.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As the same conclusion also applies to the size of the colossal Roman Baths and to the theatre seating some 9000 people, one can only assume that the central role, which Sagalassos played in the Imperial cult of Pisidia (it was twice neokoros, meaning that it had two officially recognized temple for the emperors 'cult serving a large region, undoubtedly Pisidia, of which it was also recognized as the first city) must have attracted thousands of people to the city on the days of official festivals and games, offering the visitors all kinds of facilities in structures that were much too large to serve only its own population, but that must have impressed any visitor and the city's claim to be the "first city of Pisidia."

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Odeion Report 3

  • Sagalassos 'prosperity, however, was even more stimulated by the fact that under Hadrian, the city became the neokoros of Pisidia (the center of the region's official Imperial cult).

    Hadrian at Sagalassos

  • These buildings offered the necessary infrastructure needed by a neokoros center, during the festivals and games that attracted thousands.

    Hadrian at Sagalassos

  • Under Hadrian, Sagalassos became the neokoros city of Pisidia, the region's center of the officially recognized Imperial cult.

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Roman Baths Report 3

  • As it connected the shrine of Apollo Klarios and the Flavian imperial house to the large neokoros (or provincial) sanctuary for the divine Hadrian and for Antoninus Pius, built in the middle of the second century, it must also have functioned as a kind of procession street during imperial festivals.

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Survey Report 4: Geophysical

  • The office of [Greek: neokoros] is a comparatively humble one in itself, but it is honourable enough when the shrine is at once the work and the monument of two such masters of English as Scott and Dryden.

    The Dramatic Works of John Dryden

  • The office of [Greek: neokoros] is a comparatively humble one in itself, but it is honourable enough when the shrine is at once the work and the monument of two such masters of

    The Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Volume 1 With a Life of the Author

  • They needed not to be so loud and strenuous in asserting a truth which nobody denied, or could be ignorant of: Every one knows that the city of the Ephesians is a worshipper of the great goddess Diana; is neokoros; not only that the inhabitants were worshippers of this goddess, but the city, as a corporation, was, by its charter, entrusted with the worship of Diana, to take care of her temple, and to accommodate those who came thither to do her homage.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

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