Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as night-raven.
  • n. The night-jar or goatsucker, Caprimulgus europæus. See cut under goatsucker.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “I am the dwarf Nectabanus,” said the abortion-seeming male, in a voice corresponding to his figure, and resembling the voice of the night-crow more than any sound which is heard by daylight.

    The Talisman

  • ` ` I am the dwarf Nectabanus, '' said the abortion-seeming male, in a voice corresponding to his figure, and resembling that of the night-crow more than any sound which is heard by daylight.

    The Talisman

  • The night-crow crouches on the newly-dug flower-bed to lure its mate.

    Married

  • He listened to the nuptial song of the insects above the lime trees, which rings in our ears like a funeral dirge: he heard the purring call of the night-crow; the ardent mewing of the cat, which sounds as if death, and not life, were wooing; the humming note of the dung-beetle, the fluttering of the large moths, the thin peeping of the bats.

    Married

  • I even brooked to jest with the night-crow, as my own poor lord called this Nan Boleyn.

    The Armourer's Prentices

  • The latter nestles also in clefts of rocks, and is known by the name of the night-crow.

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 1

  • Wolsey himself spoke of her under the title of "the night-crow," [189] as the person to whom he owed all which was most cruel in his treatment; as "the enemy that never slept, but studied and continually imagined, both sleeping and waking, his utter destruction." [

    The Reign of Henry the Eighth, Volume 1 (of 3)

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