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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Sir H.E. Roscoe, "That he had been unable to make a nitro-cotton with a higher nitrogen content than 13.7."

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • It is made from insoluble nitro-cotton, treated in a particular manner by steam, and mixed with nitro-benzene.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • Having traced the cause of its instability to the presence of substances caused by the action of the nitric acid on the resinous or fatty substances contained in the cotton fibre, he succeeded in eliminating them, by boiling the nitro-cotton in water, and by a thorough washing, after pulping the cotton in poachers.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • The discovery of gun-cotton is generally attributed to Schönbein (1846), but Braconnot (in 1832) had previously nitrated starch, and six years later Pelouse prepared nitro-cotton and various other nitro bodies, and

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • The nitro-cotton is gelatinised by means of acetic ether, and the skin produced retards burning.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • The nitro-cotton is mixed with acetic ether, and when the gelatinisation has taken place, the plastic mass is forced through holes in a metal plate into strips, which are then cut up into pieces the size of grains.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • Some solvent that dissolves the nitro-cotton is also used.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • The solution being all in the measuring tube, the pressure tube is again slightly raised, and the tube containing the nitro-cotton solution shaken for ten minutes with considerable violence.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • The weighed residue must afterwards be treated in a flask with ether-alcohol to dissolve out the nitro-cotton.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

  • With a few exceptions, nearly all these powders are nitro compounds, and chiefly consist of some form of nitro-cellulose, either in the form of nitro-cotton or nitro-lignine; or else contain, in addition to the above, nitro-glycerine, with very often some such substance as camphor, which is used to reduce the sensitiveness of the explosive.

    Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise

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