Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The addition of a final n-sound to words in some Semitic languages
  • n. A speech disorder stammering, in which the ‘’n’’ sound is given to other consonants.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The pronunciation of n at the end of words.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The frequent use of the letter n; specifically, the addition of n to a final vowel. Also nunation.

Etymologies

From Arabic Nun- نون the letter n. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “Tanwin” (nunnation) is pronouncing the vowels of the case-endings of a noun with n un for

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • This nunnation expresses indefiniteness, e.g. “Malikun” = a king, any king.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • This nunnation expresses indefiniteness, e.g. "Malikun" = a king, any king.

    Arabian nights. English

  • "Tanwin" (nunnation) is pronouncing the vowels of the case-endings of a noun with n un for u

    Arabian nights. English

  • Thus whilst the wife and the lover were conjoined as much as might be, the hocussed and sleeping husband was dismissed (ma'zul = degraded) like a nunnation dropped in construction.

    Arabian nights. English

  • "Tanwin al-Izafah ma'zul" = the nunnation in construction cast out.

    Arabian nights. English

  • The purest speakers are still the Badawin who are often not understood by the citizen-folk (e.g. of Cairo, Damascus and Baghdad) at whose gates they tent; and a few classes like the Banú Fahim of Al-Hijáz still converse sub-classically, ever and anon using the terminal vowels and the nunnation elsewhere obsolete.

    Arabian nights. English

  • “Tanwin al-Izafah ma’zul” = the nunnation in construction cast out.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Thus whilst the wife and the lover were conjoined as much as might be, the hocussed and sleeping husband was dismissed (ma’zul = degraded) like a nunnation dropped in construction.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • In construction or regimen (izafah) the nunnation must also disappear, as Maliku ‘I-Hind) = the King of Hind (a King of Hind would be Malikun min Muluki ‘I-Hind) = a King from amongst the Kings of Hind).

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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