Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A child that is nursed; a nursling.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

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Examples

  • Many of these young women come to Madrid on the chance of finding situations, leaving their own babies behind to be fed by hand, or Heaven knows how; they bring with them a young puppy to act as substitute until the nurse-child is found, and may be seen in the registry offices waiting to be hired, with their little canine foster-children.

    Spanish Life in Town and Country

  • One supposes he is a nurse-child, received by my parents.

    Sacred and Profane Love

  • "If she doesn't make it up with that good man," Mrs. Ellmother thought, on her way back to the house, "my nurse-child is what I have never believed her to be yet -- she's a fool."

    I Say No

  • The poor fellow was delighted that his nurse-child, as he always called little Katie, had not forgotten him, but evinced the most lively satisfaction at the sight of her dark friend.

    Roughing It in the Bush

  • The poor fellow was delighted that his nurse-child, as he always called little Katie, had not forgotten him, but evinced the most lively satisfaction at the sight of her dark friend.

    Roughing It in the Bush

  • She shed some tears while she said this, and assured Lady Moncton that the baby's death had occasioned her as much grief as if he had been her own -- that she would much rather that I had died than her dear nurse-child.

    The Monctons: A Novel, Volume I

  • The poor fellow was delighted that his nurse-child, as he always called little

    Life in the Backwoods

  • Lady Tavistock into a small chandler's shop, and given her a nurse-child to tend, her life would have been saved.

    Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson

  • I knowe not how they should, since they will shut them out of the armes of nature, and leave them to the will of a stranger; yea to one that will seeme to estrange her selfe from her owne child, to give sucke to the nurse-child: This she may faine to doe upon a covetous composition, but she frets at it in her minde, if she have any naturall affection.

    The Countesse of Lincolnes Nurserie

  • I know not how they should, since they will shut them out of the armes of nature, and leave them to the will of a stranger; yea to one that will seeme to estrange her selfe from her owne childe, to give sucke to the nurse-child.

    The Countesse of Lincolnes Nurserie

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