Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In law, held by that form of tenure which is based on the occupation or seizing and holding in actual possession of that which was without owner when occupied: as, an occupative field.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The spelling of occupative surnames often differs from that now associated with the trade itself.

    The Romance of Names

  • We have a few traces of this oldest group of occupative names, e.g. Webb, Mid.

    The Romance of Names

  • Another exceptional group is that of names formed by adding - son to the occupative names, the commonest being perhaps Clarkson, Cookson,

    The Romance of Names

  • Money itself is usually occupative or local (Chapter XVII), and

    The Romance of Names

  • Anglo-Saxon personal names, it is not always possible to say whether a surname is essentially occupative or not, e.g. whether Durward is rather "door-ward" or for Anglo-Sax.

    The Romance of Names

  • A number of occupative names have lost the last syllable by dissimilation, e.g. Pepper for pepperer, Armour for armourer.

    The Romance of Names

  • Taking the different classes of surnames separately, the six commonest occupative names are Smith, Taylor, Clark, Wright, Walker, Turner.

    The Romance of Names

  • Of occupative names which have also an official meaning, the three commonest are Ward, Bailey, and Marshall.

    The Romance of Names

  • The only true occupative name in the list is Cook, for Earl is a nickname.

    The Romance of Names

  • Thus Knight is more often a true occupative name, and the same applies to Dring or Dreng, a Scandinavian name of similar meaning.

    The Romance of Names

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