Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The common Mexican or candlewood pine (which see, under pine). In New Mexico the word is used to designate very resinous pine-wood.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They represent one of the few examples of lowland and premontane pine forests in the Neotropics, where the predominant tree species is Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis (pine, ocote), which requires periodic low intensity burns for its regeneration.

    Belize

  • Three or four bits of ocote, each bit no bigger than a long finger, flickered and rose in quick flames from the stone, and the courtyard danced with shadow.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • Then he came running from the house with a bit of burning ocote wood.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • They were nine men in the ring, the boy, who sat apart watching the two ocote torches, which he had laid upon a stone supported on a long cane tripod, being the tenth.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • Well then — ah — yes — I bought ocote for three centavos!

    The Plumed Serpent

  • In silence, Ramón kindled shreds of cane and ocote, with a burning-glass.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • The guard of Huitzilopochtli, in serapes of black, red, and yellow stripes, striped like tigers or wasps, stood holding torches of blazing ocote.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • There was a smell of burning paint, and wool, and ocote.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • There was a dense throng of men gathered now, and from the centre the ruddy glow of ocote torches rose warm and strong, and the sweet scent of the cedar-like resin was on the air.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • There was a crackling, and a puffing of whitish smoke, the sweet scent of ocote, and orange-red tongues of half-substantial flame were leaping up in the hot white air.

    The Plumed Serpent

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