Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as orange-wife.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Good even to you, pretty maiden!" said the cavalier, approaching the stall of the orange-woman with the easy, confident air of one secure of a ready welcome, and bending down on the yet prayerful maiden the glances of a pair of piercing hazel eyes that looked out on each side of his aquiline nose with the keenness of a falcon's.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 43, May, 1861 Creator

  • Mr. Bowdoin got up hurriedly, and, nodding to the orange-woman, shuffled into his house.

    Pirate Gold

  • The old crossing-sweeper was already there, to receive his penny; and the orange-woman, expectant, sold her apex orange to him for a silver thripenny bit as his before-breakfast while awaiting the more dignified cunctation of his auguster spouse.

    Pirate Gold

  • Mr. Bowdoin's eyes wandered from the orange-woman to the telescope-man, and thence to an old elm with one gaunt dead limb that stretched out over the dawn.

    Pirate Gold

  • “Good even to you, pretty maiden!” said the cavalier, approaching the stall of the orange-woman with the easy, confident air of one secure of a ready welcome, and bending down on the yet prayerful maiden the glances of a pair of piercing hazel eyes that looked out on each side of his aquiline nose with the keenness of a falcon's.

    Agnes of Sorrento

  • "He was scribbling caricatures all the time I was talking with his father in my parlour," says Mr. Baines, and produces a sketch of an orange-woman near the Bank, who had struck Clive's eyes, and been transferred to the blotting-paper in Fog Court.

    The Newcomes

  • Moorfields -- that she bore the best of characters -- and that if nothing could be said against her but by an orange-woman, there was no great reason to believe such scandal.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 04

  • Her little brother John was not at home when she was going away; he was at a carpenter's shop in the neighbourhood mending a wheelbarrow, which belonged to that good-natured orange-woman who gave him the orange for his father.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 04

  • But take care you don't tumble over the orange-woman -- orange barrows are a great nuisance, when one's studying

    Tales and Novels — Volume 06

  • "Stop!" cried the orange-woman, laying a strong detaining hand on the footman's arm; "stop you -- 'tis I'll go with more sense -- and speed."

    Tales and Novels — Volume 09

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