Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The affective and conative character of mental activity as contrasted with its cognitive aspect; the appetitive aspect of an act; desire, appetite.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In medicine, a desire or appetite.

Etymologies

From Latin orexis ("longing; appetite"), from Ancient Greek ὄρεξις (oreksis, "desire"), from ὀρέγω (oregō, "I reach, stretch"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • [Greek: orexis] means literally "a grasping at or after" now as this physically may be either vague or definite, so too may the mental act, consequently the term as transferred to the mind has two uses, and denotes either the first wish, [Greek: boulaesis], or the last definite movement, Will in its strict and proper sense.

    Ethics

  • But one obvious function of the feelings and passions in our composite nature is to instigate Action, when Reason and Conscience by themselves do not: so that as a matter of fact our Moral Choice is, in general, fairly described as [Greek: orexis dianoetike].

    Ethics

  • These two uses are recognised in the Rhetoric (I 10), where [Greek: orexis] is divided into

    Ethics

  • [Greek: orexis], desire of a thing, which is opposed to [Greek: ekklisis], aversion.

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

  • * eph 'hemin men hupolepsis, horme, orexis, ekklisis, kai heni logo hosa hemetera erga: [1770] 1

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • [1427] cf. Epictetus, Ench.i. eph 'hemin men hupolepsis, horme, orexis, ekklisis, kai heni logo hosa hemetera erga.

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • That difference is founded, I think, on the two senses of [Greek: orexis] before alluded to (note, p. 53, l.

    Ethics

  • (Orexin comes from the Greek word for appetite, "orexis ''.)

    Boston.com Most Popular

  • Rather it is hoped that the haecceity of this enchiridion of arcane and recondite sesquipedalian items will appeal to the oniomania of an eximious Gemeinschaft whose legerity and sophrosyne, whose Sprachgefühl and orexis will find more than fugacious fulfillment among its felicific pages. "

    languagehat.com

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