Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Excessively kind; kind beyond deserts; unnecessarily kind.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Kind to excess; kind beyond deserts; unnecessarily kind.

Etymologies

From over- +‎ kind. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Flightplan, I was told, was lame, and, as usual, the person who delivered this judgement was breathtakingly overkind.

    Observation #432

  • Fortune was not overkind, but his 'virtues and pious intentions may be read ... shining too gloriously to be dusked by misfortune.'

    Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts

  • Difficulties that check others fall away from him; he is smiled upon for his kindred's sake before he makes friends for his own; the world is overkind to his virtues and blind to his faults; he enters manhood indeed as "of one our conquerors"; and it will cost him some trouble to throw away his advantages.

    England's Effort: Letters to an American Friend

  • Billy felt that Fate was overkind to him, and he lost no time in heeding her call.

    The Mucker

  • Even that great man whose memory we love and revere, Charles Dickens, was not overkind to us, and saw our faults rather than our virtues.

    The Crisis — Complete

  • Perhaps in her desire to secure my services for the cause she may have shown herself overkind; or perhaps I was still young enough to set down to my own charms a success due to quite different causes.

    The Letter

  • “Master Simonides is overkind,” had ventured the athlete; “but I am sure his praise is only polite compliment.”

    A Victor of Salamis

  • He was all sympathy, all comfort, all encouragement -- if anything, too indulgent and overkind.

    Charles Frohman: Manager and Man

  • I followed these not overkind or polite instructions and found myself in a dark, uncomfortable back-parlor.

    Ten Days in a Mad-House

  • Difficulties that check others fall away from him; he is smiled upon for his kindred's sake before he makes friends for his own; the world is overkind to his virtues and blind to his faults; he enters manhood indeed as "one of our conquerors"; and it will cost him some trouble to throw away his advantages.

    The War on All Fronts: England's Effort Letters to an American Friend

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