Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The glyceryl ester, C3H5(OOC16H31)3, of palmitic acid, found in palm oil and animal fats and used to manufacture soap. Also called tripalmitin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A solid crystallizable fat, found in animal and vegetable tissues, that is a glyceride of palmitic acid, three molecules of palmitic acid being united to one molecule of glyceryl.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A solid crystallizable fat, found abundantly in animals and in vegetables. It occurs mixed with stearin and olein in the fat of animal tissues, with olein and butyrin in butter, with olein in olive oil, etc. Chemically, it is a glyceride of palmitic acid, three molecules of palmitic acid being united to one molecule of glyceryl, and hence it is technically called tripalmitin, or glyceryl tripalmitate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The principal solid ingredient of palm-oil, C3H5(C16H31O2)3, a solid colorless crystalline substance, melting at about 45°C.: it is the triglyceride of palmitic acid. Also palmine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an ester of glycerol and palmitic acid

Etymologies

French palmitine, perhaps from palmite, pith of the palm tree, from Portuguese palmito, diminutive of palma, palm, from Latin palma; see palm2.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The reactions with stearin and palmitin (of which tallow chiefly consists) and with olein (found largely in olive and cotton-seed oils) are as follows: --

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • Of the above the most important from a soap-maker's point of view are stearin, palmitin, olein and laurin, as these predominate in the fats and oils generally used in that industry.

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • After melting and solidifying, palmitin shows no crystalline fracture; when heated to 46° C. it melts to a liquid which becomes solid on further heating, again liquefying when 61. 7° C. is reached, and becoming cloudy, with separation of crystalline particles.

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • It has been prepared synthetically by heating glycerol and oleic acid together, and may be obtained by submitting olive oil to a low temperature for several days, when the liquid portion may be further deprived of any traces of stearin and palmitin by dissolving in alcohol.

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • The presence of stearin and palmitin, which are solid at the ordinary temperature, gives firmness to

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • CH_ {2} OOC_ {16} H_ {31} CH_ {2} OH palmitin sodium sodium glycerol hydroxide palmitate

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • As found in food materials, it is a mechanical mixture of various fats, among which are stearin, palmitin, and olein.

    Human Foods and Their Nutritive Value

  • Stearin and palmitin are hard fats, crystalline in structure, and with a high melting point, while olein is

    Human Foods and Their Nutritive Value

  • All fats can be separated into glycerol and a fatty acid, glycerol or glycerine being common constituents, while each fat yields its own characteristic acid, as stearin, stearic acid; palmitin, palmitic acid; and olein, oleic acid.

    Human Foods and Their Nutritive Value

  • ~ Butter fat consists principally of olein, palmitin, and stearin.

    An Elementary Study of Chemistry

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