Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See pasquin.
  • transitive v. See pasquin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A lampoon or pasquinade; a squib.
  • Relating to or of the nature of a lampoon or pasquinade: as, pasquil literature.
  • Same as pasquinade.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is an old saying, [2161] A blow with a word strikes deeper than a blow with a sword: and many men are as much galled with a calumny, a scurrilous and bitter jest, a libel, a pasquil, satire, apologue, epigram, stage-play or the like, as with any misfortune whatsoever.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • For the Great Marquis, who reminded De Retz of the men in Plutarch's _Lives_, was not averse from the practice of poetry, and wrote, besides these numbers, a prayer ( 'Let them bestow on every airth a limb'), a 'pasquil,' a pleasant string of conceits in praise of woman, a set of vehement and fiery memorial stanzas on the King, and one copy of verses more.

    Lyra Heroica A Book of Verse for Boys

  • The zeal of the Scottish reformers was at its height, and this zeal found vent in many a pasquil discharged at Popery.

    A Book of Old Ballads — Complete

  • It is not to be marvelled at if the Regent did style the letter a “pasquil.”

    John Knox and the Reformation

  • Yet, a few days later, he writes, the Regent handed his letter to the Archbishop of Glasgow, saying, “Please you, my Lord, to read a pasquil,” an offence which Knox never forgave and bitterly avenged in his “History.”

    John Knox and the Reformation

  • Also a filthy and insulting pasquil, perhaps composed by Paul Crell, in which

    Historical Introductions to the Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church

  • Glancing carelessly over it, she handed it to the Archbishop of Glasgow beside her, with the remark, “Please you, my lord, to read a pasquil.”

    Luther and Other Leaders of the Reformation

  • A pasquil on the Commander in Chief, or a tirade against the Government, was sure to be eagerly read and warmly approved of.

    Russia

  • Archbishop of Glasgow, saying, "Please you, my Lord, to read a pasquil," an offence which Knox never forgave and bitterly avenged in his

    John Knox and the Reformation

  • It is not to be marvelled at if the Regent did style the letter a "pasquil."

    John Knox and the Reformation

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