Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A hedge-priest or orator among gipsies and beggars. Also patercove.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • _ Yes, sir; a cunning man, and a fortune-teller; a very ancient stroller all the world over, and has travelled with gipsies: and is a patrico.

    Rookwood

  • Zoroaster leaped from the table, and his example was followed by Turpin, and more leisurely by the patrico.

    Rookwood

  • "Eleanor is the name, assuredly," replied the patrico, somewhat surprised.

    Rookwood

  • "They have ridden, I understand, from Rookwood," answered the patrico.

    Rookwood

  • "I come to tell you that there are strangers -- ladies -- within the priory," said the patrico, gravely.

    Rookwood

  • This venerable personage was no other than the patrico, or hierophant of the Canting Crew.

    Rookwood

  • To the Bowling-green the party proceeded, leaving the patrico in undisturbed possession of the lifeless body of Black Bess.

    Rookwood

  • Astonished at the sight of the party, the patrico was about to address the priest as an acquaintance, when his more orthodox brother raised his finger to his lips, in token of caution.

    Rookwood

  • During this overture the patrico and the upright man had ascended the rostrum, each taking his place; the former on the right hand of Turpin, the latter upon his left.

    Rookwood

  • "Who is this?" exclaimed the Major, flinging himself from his horse, and seizing the patrico; "this is not Turpin."

    Rookwood

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.